WHAT WOULD YOU DO IF YOU WERE US?

Posted by Ifat Pridan on

We get it. It's hot outside, the AC is on, people are coming in to cool down, we get it, we even offer them fans. What we don't get is people coming in while talking on the phone. Telling the boss they are at home and the camera is not working, venting about the husband (this can get really juicy) or being really nasty with ugly gossip, we heard it all. 

Not only that, they have the nerve to signal me with their hand that they are on the phone (like I can not see or hear it) and then cover the other ear because my music is too loud for them. I wish I could blame it on the Millennials, but nope! These are people from all ages, Baby Boomers, Generation X, Y and Z. Am I wrong to think that there is a huge difference between strolling in a mall for hours talking on the phone, and opening a physical door to a small shop and behaving like you are in a public space? I can see them glancing at our red sofa and I am thinking "DON'T YOU DARE!"

What do you tell these people? How do you get them out of my "home"? The boutique is such a small and personal space that is meant to be welcoming and inspiring, not a phone booth... sometimes it's just Phyllis or me in the boutique, so it is really a one-on-one type of thing. With one person having a very intimate conversation, it can become really uncomfortable. Should we step out to give them some privacy???

I have my theory on why this is happening, but I am not taking the risk of sounding like a grumpy old woman, so the question is, what can we do about it? I am not on an education mission, I have no intent to teach them better, but I do need them out of LiLi The First.

← Older Post Newer Post →


Comments


  • The little resale shop in Vienna, that was near your first boutique, had the cutest little sign as you entered the shop, something with a little rhyme. I wish I could remember the words. It wasn’t as direct as “please be polite or get out of my sight” because it was a little nicer. Perhaps "No cell phones here, just class and poise; we can’t help you select our great clothes with all that noise. Or write your own. Good luck!

    Harriet M. Epstein on
  • “Don’t share on the phone here what you’d never want the Washington Post to publish. Better yet – turn off the phone and enjoy shopping.”

    “Please don’t air your dirty laundry around our beautiful apparel.”

    ML on
  • With respect for each of us, PLEASE—— no cell phone use in our store. You are welcome to come in when you finish your phone conversation

    Jane Devine on
  • Just write no phones in the boutique, private conversations to be upheld outside.
    None of your regular customers would behave like that. The type you described is nobody’s crowd.

    Emma Kinev on
  • As we say in the South,”Bless your Heart”! You certainly have a lot of business to talk about. You should come back when we can have your undivided attention, and find you some wonderful pieces to enhance your wardrobe! And yes, drape your sofa with clothes like someone said before! You got this!!😀💃

    Nancy Morrison on
  • Hang a cute sign on the door “please keep your phone calls outside the shop. We gossip!”

    Chris Masbe on
  • Keep what you say as precise and short as possible, make it about a general policy, and keep it from sounding personal. “The policy in the boutique for the comfort of everyone is no personal calls. If you would like to step out, we would be happy to help you when you’re done with the call.”

    Joyce Sousa on
  • Can u simply say. The personal conversations are embarrassing to u and others. Interrupt andSay please come back after u have completed ur call. You can also drape ur sofa with merchandise. Offer to remove it for others

    Penne on

Leave a comment

Secrets From The Fitting Rooms

RSS